Learn to play the piano

The music made on the piano is conventionally scripted in the form of staff notations on the music sheet. Hence, familiarizing yourself with the piano notes and the staff music notations is an extremely important task.

It’s always a subjective matter of finding one instrument easier to comprehend than another, but for many, the piano helps make learning theory very easy. Playing a scale is simplified once you know where the notes are, which is also easy to figure out. In this article, we tell you about the different notes that you need to know in order to play the piano and give you some tips that will help you play the instrument.
Getting to Know the Piano Notes
Synthesizer Isolated On White
A grand piano has 88 keys. Of those, 52 are white and 36 are black. Each key represents a particular note, whose pitch is not replicated anywhere else on the piano. You have the seven natural notes in music: C, D, E, F, A, B, all of which fall on the white keys. The sharp (or flat) notes, A#, C#, D#, F#, and G#, fall on the black keys. Since B and E don’t have sharps, you get the black keys in groups of two and three, with two successive white keys in between.

The white key to the left of the group of two black keys is always C. The key that represents C in the middle of the piano is called the ‘Middle C’. It represents the center of the grand staff, which is the C note that divides the bass clef and the treble clef.
Piano Notes in Scales
Notes on a piano
In your beginner’s technical training, you’ll come across scales. To play the scales on the piano is quite easy, once you know which scale has accidentals. Let’s take the first, and the easiest example, of the C major scale. The scale is made of all natural notes, no accidentals. The scale goes C, D, E, F, G, A, B, and the higher C. To play the scale in an ascending order, all you have to do is to locate the starting note C, and play all the white notes from it.

Taking another scale, G major, we come across a sharp F here. F# will be the black key that comes right after the white F key. So the scale G, A, B, C, D, E, F# will be played with all the notes from G to E on the white keys, and then you play the black F#, skipping the F. Similarly, all the other scales will respectively employ white keys for naturals and black keys for accidentals.